JWT Melbourne introduces a literary innovation with Wi-Fiction at Melbourne Writers Festival

wifiction loc.jpgJWT Melbourne has launched a world-first digital literary innovation at the Melbourne Writers Festival, using Wi-Fi networks to bring short stories to the mobile devices of unsuspecting festival goers.

Called Wi-Fiction, the initiative was created as part of JWT's brief from Melbourne Writers Festival to make stories more accessible to the public.


VIEW THE CONCEPT
WiFiction.jpgPowering Wi-Fiction is 'Router Writer', a box full of wireless routers, placed at the epicentre of the week-long festival at Federation Square Atrium.

When the public tried to browse the internet on their smartphone or tablet devices, they were shown a list of Wi-Fi network names which created the Wi-Fiction stories.

Says
JWT Melbourne executive creative director Richard Muntz: "Wi-Fiction is a new genre and medium of storytelling which, for the first time, uses Wi-Fi networks as a communication medium. Router Writer was an innovative and ingeniously simple way of bringing the stories to life."

27 Comments

sydney person said:

fucking cool.

Name or pseudonym (required) said:

Good and good.

AA said:

JWT Sydney creatives talk the talk.

JWT Melbourne creatives walk the walk.

AK said:

Good case study I guess...

Andy said:

New territory again. Well done.

nob said:


JWT Sydney creatives talk the talk.

JWT Melbourne creatives walk the walk.

JWT Melbourne Creatives also write self congratulatory posts on the blog.

Nicety nice said:

Simples and clever.

Pfffft said:

Oh please, that's not innovative

Credits? said:

Who are the creatives that worked on this? Is Richard Muntz saying that this idea is completely his?

Robin H. said:

This was Amy Smith's idea!! Give it back to her now, you robbers!!

Au contraire said:

Putting stories in the phones of people who are interested in stories, by using an established medium in a completely different way...kinda innovative, isn't?

Lique Madiq said:

It's innovate . . . back in 1976!!

Boo said:

I liked it better when Hemingway did it in 6 words.

80085 said:

Kick Ass!

DARTH VADER said:

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!

And said:


C'mon no jwt walks the walk.

sammy said:

Can someone explain? is this anything more than naming a few Wi-Fi networks? As clicking on them would simply give you internet access not a link to the story?

What the point of being given a whole lot of titles and no access to the actual content?

"they were shown a list of Wi-Fi network names which created the Wi-Fiction stories" - how do network names create a story?

Either I'm missing an obvious part of this or its designed to wow people who have no technical knowledge.

HO said:

JWT Melbourne creatives have earned the right to!

Phorrest Humpadink said:

Life is like a box of chocolates made by JWT creatives. You never know what kind of shit they're going to taste like.

Bad news said:

Been done.

I don't have the link handy but it was done in an airport to communicate an offer.


HEY said:

You're single-handedly keeping the JWT name alive in the asia region.

Au contraire said:

Putting stories in the phones of people who are interested in stories, by using an established medium in a completely different way...kinda innovative, isn't?

In Melbourne said:

Yes - I was waiting for one of the sessions and I noticed this. Very clever.

Anonymous said:

Who is Amy Smith?

Cringeworthy said:

The posts from JWT on here are really embarrassing. You, more than any other creative dept in Melbourne need to get off the blog and go do some good work... Maybe on a client other than mwf...

Account Circus said:

So let me get this straight - you created a clever way of advertising something TO PEOPLE WHO WERE ALREADY THERE?

And were the "stories" shown jumbled? How did you ensure they played out in order in the Wifi lists?

Fucking hell, something fishy going on here.

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