Domain launches six-part online content series 'The Circle' part of its spring marketing campaign

Header_Image (1).jpgDomain has released its new, six-part online content series, The Circle, with the full first season now available to watch on Domain.

Created by Felix Williamson, co-director, screenplay author and star of Domain's INMA-award winning video series Avalon Now, and brought to life by producer, Hamish Roxburgh, The Circle follows two couples who decide to leave their poky apartments in Sydney and Melbourne for a new, more affordable life in Queensland's beautiful, sub-tropical Sunshine Coast.  One character from Bondi decides to become a real estate agent.

VIEW THE SERIES
The Circle focuses on the underlying theme of who people are based on where they choose to live.
 
Over six episodes, the characters endure the trials and tribulations of 'adapting to paradise' meeting new locals and adjusting to a new laidback life amongst garden blowers and tradies forgoing work for surf.

Says Melina Cruickshank, Domain's chief of editorial and marketing: "We like the spirit that humour brings to our marketing mix.  With Avalon Now, we found the simplicity of making people laugh via dark humour really worked in growing our brand.

"We're not overtly selling a product or pushing a message with this approach. We focus on the unique characteristics of who people are based on where they choose to live.

"Avalon Now 1 and 2 showed us our audiences will let us know if we're on the right track. These are modest budget projects with actors wanting to do great work and we love they enable us to connect at scale.

"With Noosa being one of the most searched suburbs on Domain, we thought it was the perfect place for our Melbourne and Sydney characters to move to. Over a 3 week period running The Circle teasers, videos have received over 2M views with over 12,000 points of engagement so early signs are good."

The series casts some of Australia's most recognisable on screen talent, including Rebecca Gibney from Wanted, Richard Roxburgh from Rake, Daniel Wyllie from Puberty Blues and Love My Way, Felix Williamson from The Great Gatsby, Geraldine Hakewill from Wanted, David Berry from Outlander, Nathaniel Dean from Alien Covenant, Ming-Zhu Hii from The Ex-PM, and Brooke Nichole Lee from Mako Mermaids, with a special feature by musician Wes Carr, who also composed the entire score, including the theme song for the series.

Produced by: Hamish Roxburgh & Felix Williamson
Written and directed: Felix Williamson
Original concept: Felix Williamson
Director of Photography: Alex Dufficy
Edited by: Scott Warmsley

11 Comments

Sam Yeomans said:

Great fun Felix. Well Done!

Not So New AD Guy said:

Truly horrible.

I got about 10 seconds in and I was skipping for the good part, which never came.

@Sam Yeomans said:

it's terrifying g to think you judge reels before you show creatives

Maurice said:

10 x better than content agencies write

@maurice said:

Was this an ironic comment?

Sallie Hudson said:

A great idea, amazing production values, good writing, eye-poppingly poor, tone-deaf diversity. All SIX couples are white and in heterosexual relationships. WAKE UP DOMAIN! Your ceatives may all be white male heterosexuals in relationships, but your market is not.

FACT FINDER said:

To @ Sally Hudson: Last Census reveals 69 % of Australians are of English,Scottish or Irish descent. Pretty sure Domain have a huge chance at hitting this majority market with the 'white' cast.
Trying to reach your smaller markets as well usually ends up with a scatter campaign. Starting with your major market first is still a good idea - if the data fits - go for it.

FACT FINDER's research assistant said:

Sorry boss, I think you might be a generation or two out.
The latest census puts Australians who identify as being of English, Irish or Scottish descent at a bit over 56%.
So - and do correct me if I'm wrong because you clearly know your stuff - the data would suggest that maybe Domain could have shot for a few non-white faces... you know, 4 or 5 of the 12?
Or does that data not "fit"?

Fact Finder said:

To FFRA: Not quite a generation or two. Current 2016 figures also show only approx 6% and 5% as Chinese and Indian as next country of birth compared to larger majority of Celtic origin. However, before usual 'outrage', firstly would consult Domain, who would have set up their target market through their own data. Considered a leader in their field, could presume they know their market! I would not presume to know their future campaigns. Noosa does seem to be a majority data location !

FACT FINDER's *former* research assistant said:

Chief...
Sorry, but I really don't think this is going to work out in the long term.
You can't use facts as a shield... and then not use the facts.
A big one for you to consider: ancestry and country of birth are very different things.
Another - being of British origin doesn't necessarily mean being white.
Nor, for that matter, does being of Australian ancestry.
And this stuff matters because every time a brand paints 'white' as the normal, people of colour feel it.
So, two parting gifts:
One - maybe have another read of the "data" from the ABS:
http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/Lookup/by%20Subject/2071.0~2016~Main%20Features~Cultural%20Diversity%20Data%20Summary~15
Two - I've left your Southern Cross flag folded on your desk.

Wow said:

The only comment that matters in this debate is @FACT FINDER's *former* research assistant's.......every time a brand paints 'white' as the normal, people of colour feel it. They are right. I do, every time.

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