Adorable disaster-prone beans set to return with launch of 'Dumb Ways to Die 3: World Tour' game

pasted image 0.jpgThe wildly successful public safety campaign that planted a catchy tune in everyone's head five years ago is set to return with the launch of Dumb Ways to Die 3: World Tour. Dumb Ways To Die, the Australian Metro Trains campaign, developed by McCann Melbourne, is the most awarded in advertising history and at the Cannes Lions Festival.

The numbers are impressive--294 million YouTube views and 14.8 million website visits, as well as 288 million downloads and 6.4 billion play sessions of the mobile phone games--but the story is far from over. Dumb Ways to Die is expanding into new frontiers, continuing its mission to be the safety champions of everything.
pasted image 0-1.jpgOver the coming months, Dumb Ways to Die will be releasing a suite of fresh content. This will give fans an unprecedented peek into the world of the "Beans", the adorably disaster-prone characters that are recognised and loved around the world.

The public has already had the chance to get up close and personal with the Beans thanks to Dumb VR demo. At the recent PAX Australia video game expo, fans queued for up to an hour to put on a virtual reality headset and get inside the hilarious world of Dumb Ways to Die. The biggest news, however, is the long-awaited release of the third game in the Dumb Ways to Die series.

Screen mosaic shrunk.jpgDumb Ways to Die 3: World Tour is more than just a collection of minigames. For the first time, players will be able to help the Beans by repairing their damaged homes, caring for injured beans in hospital, and rebuilding their crumbling infrastructure. They will also collect Beans and try to keep them safe during their many dangerous adventures: exploring a cursed pyramid, learning to fly a plane, and more.

Dumb Ways to Die 3: World Tour will be launched on the App Store on the 21st of December, just in time for casual holiday gaming.

6 Comments

Fact check said:

"The numbers are impressive--294 million YouTube views and 14.8 million website visits, as well as 288 million downloads and 6.4 billion play sessions of the mobile phone games"

Are they? I wonder how many of all those people live in and around Victoria near level crossings. And I wonder how many lives have been saved / deaths prevented at those level crossings because of all this. Because that's what the message was meant to be about. Lives saved should be the only result anyone talks about, but they don't. Can you guess why? But hey, reach = effectiveness and we're saving the world, so where do I pick up my Lion?

Account Circus said:

@ Fact Check

Yes, because Victoria is the only place on Earth where trains could possibly kill somebody in and around the tracks. You're essentially saying that you need proof of lives being saved from train deaths - how in the fuck do you propose to gather that data?

Merry Christmas.

@ fact check said:

You obviously haven't spent any time around kids lately. Every kid in Victoria knows this song word for word and some of those words carry a safety message. It's transcended advertising and become a part of popular culture. You do that and you can have a shinny award as well.

something said:

something something a dead horse....

@account circus said:

I think that what they were trying to say is, how have the numbers of deaths improved since this campaign. Has their been a significant drop in accidents or is it actually making no difference?

Dear Account Service 12:48 and @fact check said 2:38 said:

Account Service 12:48pm Quote :

"How in the f... are you supposed to gather that data'.

Well, McCann found a way, because they won an effective award for this campaign within months of it being launched.

[I know, it sounds ridiculous, doesn't it, but governments have a way of claiming their campaigns have been amazingly successful - Graham being the most recent example in Victoria].

@Fact check 2:38 Quote:

'Every kid in Victoria knows this song word for word and some of those words carry a safety message'

So what?

The song is about dumb ways to die not how not to die.

If only every kid in Victoria was singing 'stand behind the yellow line' then they'd be onto something.

DWTD is a great little ditty, beautifully produced matched with a some charming animation.

But ask yourself this.

Having seen it, what are kids supposed to do?

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